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The presidential election is being held today in the U.S.  Every 4 years voters pour their hearts and souls into one politician.  They spend countless hours telling the world why their candidate is the best. Sometimes it’s a vote just to make sure the other candidate doesn’t get into office. Still it’s a vote. We wave our signs, tweet, and post to “get out and vote” because “every vote matters.”

So, which is it? Does your vote matter or doesn’t it.  Are you hoping your vote today will somehow relieve you of your civic responsibility to vote every day?

Many people who are convinced that their vote every 4 years matters then go on to vote against their own values every day. They stand for environmental protection, kindness to animals, and human rights then go on to purchase chemical-laden foods, animal products, and items made using slave labor. They demand a stop to oil exploration, nuclear power, and “mountain top removal” for coal, yet they flip a switch at home or hop into their gas-powered cars or jet around the world as if their vote doesn’t doesn’t really matter.

Every Dollar Is A Vote!

Each of our choices in the past built the world we live in today. And each of our choices from this moment forward will build the world of tomorrow.

Our individual choices are VOTES!  You are voting for and actively building the future… with each and every choice, and especially with each and every purchase. In the U.S. where the government and politicians are owned by corporations, your vote was cast long ago. There’s a reason why a corporate-owned warmonger will win the election — we put the candidates in place.  We are then purposefully distracted by the idea that we now have a “choice” between candidates. Your choice was made long ago.

Your consumer choices act as the conscience of business. Businesses have grown so disconnected that they often only respond to money, not to moral principles. They no longer hear our pleas for kindness and ethics. If profits increase even though a company is spewing toxic fumes, enslaving people, or hurting animals, the company “believes” it is doing something right.

It’s not that these businesses are bad; they don’t know right from wrong — they are simply growing in the direction of YOUR votes. If your values and words which plead for humanity are drowned out by the clamor of your coins, you‘re saying to unthinking businesses, “Yes, keep doing what you’re doing… and do it in my name!”

In a corporatocracy (an economic and political system controlled by corporations or corporate interests), we must realize that government “representatives” represent the interests of their puppeteers *not* of the people. BUT, the people (each of us!) are the ones putting the puppeteers into place. We have control over our individual choices; our choices determine how the world runs, what forests get cut down, who lives and who dies. You have that kind of power. It’s an enormous responsibility, we know. But you’re already making those choices, you just might not be thinking that your vote matters.

Every dollar you spend or choose not to spend is a vote. You voted yesterday. You’ll vote today — maybe hundreds of times. Will you vote for a world that respects human rights, protects the environment, and has compassion for animals? Or will you make choices that build a world you really don’t believe in?

You help build a world reflective of our shared values of justice, kindness, and compassion only when your everyday choices are aligned with those values.

Live your values, change the world.

It’s that simple.

All one,
🙂 m

AccusationsWe posted this earlier in a longer article. But, the article was so long many people didn’t read far enough to find it. So we offer this again in the spirit of helping you, the world, and the emerging Occupy Movement.

THIS IS A CONSUMER REVOLUTION.  The state of the world is not being done TO us; it is being done BY us.  The solution isn’t outside us, it isn’t in the next political savior, it isn’t on Wall Street.  Every consumer choice EACH of us made in the past helped build the world we live in today. WE put those in power who are in power today.  WE polluted, we enslaved, we killed, WE paid for it all.  This isn’t about evil corporations, it’s about UNTHINKING CONSUMERISM.

NOW, every single choice from this moment forward will build the world of tomorrow.  SHIFT THAT POWER!  If you consume consciously only things that are aligned with your values of KINDNESS, JUSTICE, and COMPASSION… THAT is the world you will build.  If not, expect more of the same — a world out of control, twisted against everything we stand for.  This is our great power; this is our great responsibility.

Recognize that YOU already have the power.  YOU always have.  Politicians aren’t going to change that.  Corporations aren’t going to change that.  YOU matter and YOU make a difference.

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT TO GRASP because THIS is the Movement.  Everyone, every single human being is a consumer.  I don’t mean “shop till you drop” consumption (although many are dropping because of our consumption).  I mean we must consume (eat, drink, dress ourselves, find shelter, etc.) to survive.  Those simple consumer choices are not so simple and they are not personal choices — every choice you make has an impact on the world around you, on everyone, on everything.  We’ve been making unthinking consumer choice through:

  • our food choices (wasting resources, killing animals, polluting/destroying the planet, slave labor)
  • clothing (supporting slavery and prison labor, polluting, often killing animals)
  • shelter (destroying the planet, using non-renewable resources, stealing from future generations)

And the rest is just stuff we don’t even NEED!  What were we thinking?  Answer: we weren’t.  Well, now we are!  Now we must!

If you’re not in the streets protesting (and even if you are), you’re still a part of this movement.  Every human being is part of this Movement.  Every single consumer/human is building toward a new system of justice or perpetuating the system of exploitation.  It really is that simple.

EVERY consumer choice you make, EVERYTHING you buy or decide NOT to buy is either part of the solution or part of the problem.  It’s part of the collaborative NEW PARADIGM or it is in direct support of the violent exploitative paradigm you are actively fighting against.

“Talk is cheap; it’s how we organize and live our lives that says what we stand for.” – Cesar Chavez

Even if you’re in the streets “fighting for what’s right” — if you’re buying/wearing your Nike slave labor chemical soaked animal skin shoes, eating a McDonald’s burger (or any animal product), snacking on Hershey’s slave-labor cow’s-milk chocolate, driving your new gas-powered car, and wondering how your 401k might be doing rather than WHAT it is doing (not even knowing in what you’re invested)… are you really part of the solution?  Are you really part of the new paradigm?  Or are you just wasting your time — nailing one foot to the floor before running the marathon.

THIS is the Movement.  It’s a conscious CONSUMER REVOLUTION.  It is a movement of personal responsibility, of personal conscience, of BRAVERY to step out of the confines and comfort of the way it has been into the light of how it could be.

‎It’s time for a revolution. The weapon is in your heart. The weapon is love. It can not run out of ammunition; it cannot be disarmed; and when the war is won, we all win.

U.S. President Barack Obama last night on the Leno Show said about the #Occupy Movement that, “people are frustrated” and he put the responsibility on the “leaders” of industry to show the way. And he suggested (as does everyone at the helm of the broken system) that all we have to do is buy more stuff and give people jobs so they can buy more stuff, stay busy, buy more stuff, stay busy, buy more stuff…

He just doesn’t get it (on so many levels) — or more likely, he *does* get it and is laying groundwork for the broken machine. It’s not that people are “frustrated” — it’s that people have AWAKENED. “Frustrated,” by definition, implies that people are feeling angry because of their inability to change or achieve something. People aren’t frustrated; they know how to make the change — stop giving money/power to the broken system — and they’re making it happen.

And who needs “leaders” to show us the way? We KNOW the way; and it ain’t in their direction. We are all, each of us, leaders. The power is in OUR hands.

And “buy more stuff”?! Really?! That’s what got us in this mess — unthinking consumption (including war — yes it’s a money making machine to feed the broken system) cheered on by corporate politicians.

The broken system is starting to fight back. Look out. It’s confused by Nonviolence and will lash out in the only way it knows how — with violence and purposeful disconnection (the lifeblood of violence) in order to win back public support and consumer confidence (another way of saying getting people to buy more stuff — which I think is actually a sign of less confidence).

STAY AWARE, stay strong, and stay *actively* Nonviolent. Look to see more provocation in the streets.  Occupiers WILL be provoked.  There WILL be agent provocateurs in the crowds (pretending to be an Occupier, but really being an agent of the oppressor).  This is a very common tactic used to get the Movement, any successful Nonviolent movement, to appear violent so the public attention will be distracted from the purpose of the protest and so public support turns to the oppressor.  Don’t give in!.  Be aware of much less accurate media coverage, and for more media attention to fake news stories from around the world to keep you distracted and escalated wars, etc. to drum up patriotism. Stick to unfiltered news sources.

What we need is a whole new way of thinking, a whole new way of doing, a whole new way of living. Live a life connected. Live your values, change the world.

As always, if you have any questions, we’re here to help if we can.

All one,

www.NonviolenceUnited.org

War doesn’t exist because of some moral dilemma; it exists because there is money to be made. The use and abuse of helpless animals for human consumption (animal agribusiness) doesn’t exist because of some moral dilemma or even because we have to eat them; the killing happens because there is money to be made.

Oil disasters, global warming, an unthinking Wall Street, pollution, slave/prison labor, the working poor, world hunger – these don’t exist by accident; they exist because there is money to be made. Wall Street gives new meaning to the idea of “making a killing.”

How do we stop it? Stop supporting it! Stop paying for it!  It exists because WE, each of us, helped pay for and build it.  WE, each of us, with every single consumer choice (using a credit card, using a corporate bank, the companies and products we buy/consume/support, the media we “consume” by paying attention to it, even the war tax we pay to our federal government without holding it accountable) — WE built the world we live in today.  WE did this!  And WE, with every choice from this moment forward, will build the world of tomorrow.

The good news is that WE (YOU!) can turn it around virtually overnight. There is humility and a great challenge in realizing that WE did this to ourselves and that each of us has the power to put a stop to it, to build a better world.

Take personal responsibility — consume less, and when you do consume (we must to survive) do it consciously, in an informed way, and in a way that is aligned with our shared values of justice, kindness, and compassion for other people, for the planet, and for the animals.

Live your values, change the world!

There’s seems to be a hunger for a social revolution in the air.  Not a violent revolution, but a revolution of values, a call to the corporate world that enough is enough.

With that in mind, I’m reposting something I put up a few years ago along with the text to our “A Life Connected” brochure here.  While protest can be powerful and has its place, personal protest (in the form of taking responsibility for the role each of us plays in building the world in which we live) will be the fuel of the revolution.  The Nonviolence revolution.

From NonviolenceUnited.org 2007:


Click the image to read Tom Tomorrow’s cartoon.

There was a time when a half a million people demonstrating in the streets would have an impact on policy and policy makers. That time seems to have passed.

Traditional Nonviolent tactics have been studied and marginalized by our opponents. Our marches and speeches are ignored by the corporate-owned media. Our letters are ignored and our emails are deleted. We are even forced into “free speech zones” where we can be more easily ignored and controlled.

But Nonviolence isn’t just holding up signs in protest on weekends and then going back to life as usual. In order for Nonviolence to work, it must have strategy, planning and a real effect that will bring about change in the opponent or replace the unjust system entirely.

Nonviolence United advocates a form of Nonviolence that is built on strategy and has a direct effect regardless of the opponent’s conscience or their willingness to change — Nonviolence as a way of life. We can build a world reflective of our values only when we consume consciously and live our lives consistently with our values. It’s that simple.

We’re not saying demonstrations and protests don’t have a place. We’re simply suggesting more thought to what their place is in a complete strategy. We thought the cover story of the Utne Reader “Protest Is Dead. Long Live Protest.” did a good job explaining this point.

For those of you who want to learn more about taking personal responsibility for the world we, each of us, is helping create, please read our brochure “A Life Connected” available online here or read the text here (below).

>>>>>>>
ALifeConnected.org
Live A Life Connected!
A lot of us are asking the question, “What should I do with my life?” Perhaps the answer won’t be found in one great thing… but in all the little things. Your everyday choices define who you are, what you stand for, and the world you want to see.

Each of our choices in the past built the world we live in today. And each of our choices from this moment forward will build the world of tomorrow. If you’re not living your values, whose life are you living… and what kind of world are you building?

Every Dollar Is A Vote.
Every dollar you spend or choose not to spend is a vote. You voted yesterday. You’ll vote today — maybe hundreds of times. Will you vote for a world that respects human rights, protects the environment, and has compassion for animals? Or will you make choices that build a world you really don’t believe in?

Your consumer choices act as the conscience of big business. Businesses have grown so disconnected that they often only respond to money, not to moral principles. They no longer hear our pleas for kindness and ethics. If profits increase even though a company is spewing toxic fumes, enslaving people, or hurting animals, the company still believes it is doing something right.

If your words which plead for humanity are drowned out by the clamor of your coins, you‘re saying to unthinking businesses, “Yes, keep doing what you’re doing… and do it in my name!”

You help build a world reflective of our shared values of justice, kindness, and compassion when your everyday choices are aligned with those values.

It’s that simple.

“Talk is cheap… it’s how we organize and live our lives that tells what we believe in.”
– Cesar Chavez

Strategy for a Better World.
Traditional Nonviolence tactics have been studied and made less effective by those who control by force, disconnection, and violence. Marches and speeches are ignored by corporate-owned media. Letters from concerned citizens are disregarded and their emails deleted. People are even forced into “free speech zones” where they can be more easily ignored and controlled.

It’s time to live smarter. A Life Connected is a method of Active Nonviolence built on strategy. It has a direct effect regardless of an “opponent’s” conscience or willingness to change. It cannot be stopped by force. It builds rather than tears down. It replaces hate with love. And it is available to everyone.

All of us and everything are connected. Nonviolence offers you a way to live your life sincerely building, supporting, and defending these connections. Connect to your own values. Connect to other people, to the planet, and to animals. Connect to how your choices impact the world around you.

How To Live A Life Connected.
You were born with values that connect you to humanity and to the world in which you live — values of justice, kindness, and compassion. Reconnect to who you truly are. Put your compassion into action and make our world a better place.

1. Connect with yourself. Become re-aware of your moral values.
2. Connect with others. Become aware of how your everyday choices impact other people, the planet, and animals.
3. Connect your choices to your values. If your choices are truly aligned with your values, stay on that path and find even more connections. If your choices are unaligned, make new, better, and more connected choices.

“Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.”
Mohandas Gandhi

Build A Better World With Connected Choices.

Simplify. Imagine a world of billions of people living exactly as you do. Would it truly be fair and sustainable? Live simply so that others may simply live.

Fair Trade. Fair Trade ensures that farmers, artisans, and other producers get a fair price for their goods. It guarantees a living wage, encourages environmental responsibility, and reinvests in communities. Look for Fair Trade certified products.

Organic. Protect people, the planet, and precious wildlife. Organic products ensure that chemicals are not sprayed and dumped on farm workers, on the land, and in our water. Pesticides are poisons designed to kill living organisms. Promote health — including your own. And save energy. In the United States, more energy is used to produce synthetic fertilizers than to till, cultivate, and harvest all the crops.

Fair Labor. Sweatshops, child labor, and slave labor are a growing problem even in the United States. Clothing and other products like coffee, fruit, chocolate, and flowers are often produced under brutal working conditions. The cheapest products often come with the greatest human costs. Get to know more about how the products you purchase are made and make the most humane choices.

Renewable Energy. Wars are fought for resources. To build a world that is safe and secure and to preserve the planet for future generations, choose solar, wind, wave, geothermal, biofuels, and other renewable choices. If these choices aren’t readily available to you, continue to conserve energy and consider buying renewable energy credits.

Car-Free. Take a bus, ride a train, or get on the subway. Better yet walk or ride a bike. Use your own energy to get around.

Local. Be the champion of local businesses. Buying local supports small businesses, creates local jobs, and keeps more money in your community. And when you support a local company, you then have the opportunity to make sure they treat people, the planet, and animals responsibly. Unlike giant national retailers, they are members of your community.

Vegan. Vegan foods are plant-based and contain no animal products (meat, eggs, and dairy). The reasons more and more people are choosing a Vegan lifestyle include bettering human health, ending farm worker and factory worker exploitation, ending industrial racism, saving family farms, protecting the environment, ending climate change, ending world hunger, using energy and resources more wisely, conserving land, protecting wildlife, preserving our oceans and waterways, and being kind to animals. A Vegan lifestyle expands your circle of compassion to include those who rely entirely on your kindness. Vegan choices are some of the most far-reaching personal, practical, and ethical choices you can make.

Recycled. Remember, when you throw something away, there is no such thing as “away.” Use less, reuse, and recycle. Choose used and recycled products whenever possible.

Tree-Free. Choose recycled lumber and paper products, consume products with less packaging, recycle what you use, and consider tree-free papers like kenaf and hemp.

Cruelty-Free. We have the compassion, intelligence and technology to move beyond hurting animals for the production of food, clothing, cleaning products, and personal products. Industries that make a profit by hurting others do so with the consent and support of those who buy their products. Make the kind choice, buy cruelty-free.

Yes, YOU Make A Difference!

The question isn’t whether or not you, one person, can make a difference. You are making a difference. But what kind of difference are you making? What kind of difference do you want to make?

The urgent problems that people, the planet and animals are facing stem from people forgetting who they truly are. A Life Connected works as a compass to help you be who you truly are, remember your values, choose your path, and live in a reconnected way.

Being aware and aligned with your values makes you conscious, complete, and more powerful. Millions of people are reconnecting to create a remarkable movement the likes of which the world has never seen — a movement led by the individual, by the people… by YOU!

About NonviolenceUnited.org. Building A Better World.
We envision a world driven by the innate goodness of people and their values of justice, kindness, and compassion for other people, for the planet, and for animals.

Our focus is reminding everyone that we are all connected and encouraging individuals to align their everyday choices with their values — to live A Life Connected.

It’s a win-win way of living. Build a better life for you… and a better world for everyone.

Learn more and get connected at NonviolenceUnited.org.

“Live your beliefs and you can turn the world around.”
– Henry David Thoreau

Pass it on. Share the joy of living A Life Connected.

7575_loveearth

We’ve posted this in the past, but sometimes it helps me to re-read it:

http://www.nonviolenceunited.org/2009/10/i-want-to-know-what-love-is/

🙂 m

In the current difficult times of which we’re all a part, “So what” is a very popular attitude.  For those of you who teach, do activist outreach, speak in front of groups, or even just try to talk with anyone these days about the important work at hand trying to make the world a better place, I thought you might appreciate this insightful acknowledgement and explanation of those blank stares and skepticism.

It is a short excerpt from an excellent book by Cynthia Kaufman, Ideas for Action: Relevant Theory for Radical Change.

Kaufman writes, “One of the attitudes toward life that’s most popular on television as I’m writing this is cynicism.  Connecting with real people involves emotional vulnerability, and knowing about the world takes work. To protect oneself from either of those challenges, it’s attractive to adopt a worldview that says all human concepts are corrupt and that the outside world isn’t worth knowing about; that the world is corrupt and unchangeable, so informing oneself about it won’t do any good; that anyone who cares about anything is a sucker; and that people involved in social movements are a bunch of hypocrites and won’t accomplish anything anyway.  Therefore, the best strategy is to be aloof, to make fun of people who try to take the world and their existence in it seriously, and to find pleasure and humor in distancing oneself from everything.  While in many ways this cynicism appears to be a safe strategy, it rarely compensates for the loss of personal integrity and the social isolation that come with it” (252).

After reading Ideas for Action, I’ve added it to my own very small collection of what I found to be important books.  I highly recommend it to anyone who wants a firm understanding of social justice issues as well as hundreds of helpful resources for further learning, strategizing, and envisioning the future of social action.

Kaufman offers an excellent introduction and summary of social movements from a sociological perspective.  While the book is over 300 pages, the subsections are quick and understandable.  She begins by making us aware that we each carry a distorted view of the world based on our cultural norms, ideologies, upbringings, etc.  Her use of surprising historical facts (like the rise of racism only after the conquering of the Americas as a product of capitalism in its infancy) and social facts (like one in every four homeless people have a job) are an effective reminder that we don’t know everything, that we need to keep questioning, and that there is always more to the story.

Kaufman’s theme is that the more we’ve learned from history and the better we understand the context and shared interests of all social movements, the better we will be at designing and carrying out social change.

Kaufman, Cynthia C. 2003. Ideas for Action: Relevant Theory for Radical Change. Cambridge, MA: South End Press.

Thanks for tuning in… and thank you for all that you do!

All one,
🙂 m

I recently read a chapter in Ira Chernus’ American Nonviolence in which he discusses the contributions of author Henry David Thoreau to the Nonviolence movement. I was surprised to learn that ironically, while people tend to count Thoreau among the heroes of Nonviolence, he “never actually embraced the principle of Nonviolence” (54). He supported violent revolutionary acts such as John Brown’s assault on Harper’s Ferry.

Neither did Thoreau have confidence in the efforts of social justice activists. Thoreau saw social justice activists, at least those working to change policy and institutions, as wasting their time – he thought it was more important to change “individual souls” rather than social institutions: he wrote, “There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root” (52).

While I disagree with Thoreau’s confidence in violent activism, I agree with him that the success of the current revolution lies in the hearts of the people. He urged reformers to look within themselves and change themselves rather than trying to change others. I would expand his argument to include that we should still try to educate people in order to spread awareness (otherwise social change will wither on the vine) – but reminding people of their own values and showing them how to live their lives aligned with those values is hardly “changing” people; it’s waking them (I think Thoreau would agree – as I’ll explain below).

Thoreau did recognize that individuals were the building blocks of society and of societal institutions and that “one [person] expressing [their] own opinion amounted to the re-origination of many of the institutions of society” (53). What he finds to be of utmost interest and importance is waking each individual to follow their own conscience — even when this means breaking unjust laws.

His philosophy of commitment to conscience led to his own short stay (one night) in jail for refusing to pay taxes which supported the unjust U.S. war against Mexico and a government (the U.S.) that supported slavery. This experience led to his writing the infamous “Civil Disobedience” which in turn influenced Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Cesar Chavez, and countless Nonviolence activists. This contribution to Nonviolence theory is why Thoreau is still exalted as a Nonviolence theorist.

Thoreau’s way of thinking moves beyond the thinking of Thomas Hobbes, who believed that any government was better than no government. Hobbes believed that because people were innately selfish and brutish, we must transfer our right to self-rule (and even violence) to the state. Hobbes believed the government is a necessary evil. To Hobbes, there is no such thing as an unjust law because right and wrong is determined by the law.

Thoreau on the other hand, sees justice as our primary loyalty, not laws. He foresaw a day when this adherence to conscience by masses of individuals would lead to the obsolescence of the state — what Thoreau called a “glorious State.” Rather than looking to the state for guidance and punishment, each would look to themselves and their own good conscience for what is morally right. Through personal awakening, personal responsibility, and a shared commitment to our interconnected world, the state would wither and become unnecessary.

We will be held responsible for the future we build. And future generations will celebrate or suffer because of us.  It’s up to each of us to live our conscience no matter how difficult that may be. As Thoreau put it, “Live your beliefs and you can turn the world around.”

All one,

🙂 m

Chernus, Ira. 2004. “Henry David Thoreau.” 45-55 in American Nonviolence: The History of an Idea. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books.

Bobby Kennedy once said, “There is a Chinese curse which says, ‘May [you] live in interesting times.’ Like it or not, we live in interesting times…” It was 1966.

It was a turbulent time in the world. People were taking to the streets. Social movements were rising up and fighting for justice. Bobby Kennedy was a living example of how someone indoctrinated in a culture of “might makes right” could change their whole world view. After the murder of his brother, this man of power, privilege, and (some would say) arrogance turned his focus to serving those in need – the poor, the oppressed. His personal growth brought him to a point where he was willing to put his own life at risk to do what he thought was right. His transformation fascinates me. And I wonder how we can spark the transformation in others.

This month, June 2010, marks the 42nd anniversary of the assassination of Bobby Kennedy. Only two months earlier in April 1968, another Nonviolence teacher and leader, Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed. What might have been had they lived? What might have been if the efforts they were leading were more focused on the movement and less upon the perceived leaders? What if movements didn’t die with their leaders? What if each of us realized that each of us is a leader?

A student activist recently asked me with hopelessness in his voice, “Is it really worth it? Is it too late? Can we really make a difference?” The question isn’t whether or not one person can make a difference – you ARE making a difference. The question is what kind of difference do you want to make? Just because we haven’t turned things around doesn’t mean we shouldn’t keep trying. If we don’t try, we’re just as guilty as those doing harm. Being a member of the world community obligates us to try our best with the hope that whoever comes next might do better than we have.

I might as well have quoted the rest of what Bobby Kennedy said immediately after his remark about the curse of “interesting times” under which we live, “They are times of danger and uncertainty; but they are also the most creative of any time in the history of [humankind]. And everyone here will ultimately be judged — will ultimately judge [themselves] — on the effort [they have] contributed to building a new world society and the extent to which [their] ideals and goals have shaped that effort.”

Keep trying.

All one,

🙂 m

“Be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Gandhi said it and corporations and politicians co-opted it and sucked the life out of it.  But make it real and you’ll change the world.

You’re part of a NEW social movement built on compassion and personal responsibility.  Social change comes from the people UP, not from the top down.  The state of the world isn’t something being done TO us; it is being done BY us.

Each of our choices in the past built the world we live in today.  And each of our choices from this moment forward will build the world we live in tomorrow.  We will build a world reflective of our values when our everyday choices are aligned with those values.

So, c’mon!  Join the land of the living.  Be part of the solution simply by living your life completely and connectedly.

This is from our A Life Connected brochure:

How To Live A Life Connected.

You were born with values that connect you to humanity and to the world in which you live — values of justice, kindness, and compassion. Reconnect to who you truly are. Put your compassion into action and make our world a better place.

1. Connect with yourself. Become re-aware of your moral values.

2. Connect with others. Become aware of how your everyday choices impact other people, the planet, and animals.

3. Connect your choices to your values. If your choices are truly aligned with your values, stay on that path and find even more connections. If your choices are unaligned, make new, better, and more connected choices.

Thank you for all that you do!

All one,

🙂 m

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